Motorists risk being fined £50 for using fog lights incorrectly

 

Parts of the UK have had to deal with serious bouts of fog recently which can make driving conditions very difficult for motorists.

The biggest problem when fog appears on the road and you’re driving, is that your visibility is affected and it can be difficult to see the road ahead clearly.

Driving in foggy conditions can be dangerous and the chances of being involved in an accident increases as reduced visibility makes it harder for the driver to see.

Luckily, our cars have fog lights to deal with such weather conditions which help relieve some of the stress that driving in foggy weather can cause.

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Driver Warning: Using your fog lights incorrectly could lead to a £50 fine! © Copyright Mat Fascione and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Unfortunately though, many of us lack the knowledge of how to use our fog lights properly, which could be down to the fact that they’re only used on occasion, mostly during the winter months.

The fog lights in most cars are controlled by a separate switch or button or even on the headlight stalk. Once activated, a light normally appears on the dashboard to inform you that they are in use.

Cars have front and rear fog lights and typically you can choose to have either or both on depending on which ones are required at the time.

The biggest reason for a driver not using their fog lights in foggy weather is simply because they’ve failed to switch them on.

Some modern cars today feature LED daytime running lights which do help other vehicles to see you in low visibility, however they’re not designed for use in foggy weather and shouldn’t be relied upon.

Many drivers switch their fog lights on at the slightest sign of a mist but this is not when you should do so. Fog lights should only be used when your visibility is severely restricted.

They don’t help you to see the road clearly up ahead and are simply there to help other motorists know you’re on the road, as they’re normally brighter than headlights.

If used incorrectly and during normal driving conditions, the brightness of fog lights could dazzle other drivers, so it’s vital that they’re only used when needed.

And whilst they’re mainly for use in foggy weather, they can also be used in snowy weather too or during spells of very heavy rain.

According to Rule 226 of the Highway Code: “You MUST use headlights when visibility is seriously reduced, generally when you cannot see for more than 100 metres (328 feet). You may also use front or rear fog lights but you MUST switch them off when visibility improves.”

The Highway Code also states when fog lights must not be used in Rule 236: “You MUST NOT use front or rear fog lights unless visibility is seriously reduced (see Rule 226) as they dazzle other road users and can obscure your brake lights. You MUST switch them off when visibility improves.”

Improper use of fog lights is not only dangerous but could lead to a Fixed Penalty Notice (FPN) being issued and your pocket £50 lighter as a result.

 

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