Did white come out on top again or has another colour captured our imagination?..

 

Colour is important and not more so than when choosing what colour of car we would next like to drive.

It’s definitely comes down to personal preference and with so many colours to choose from these days, you’d probably assume if asked, that the top three colours for 2017 would be bright, happy colours but was this actually the case?

The Society of Motor manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) have released their list of car sales by colour for 2017 and here is the top 10 most popular car colours from last year – if you love colour, you might be surprised and a little disappointed by the top three winners!

Did white come out on top again or has another colour captured our imagination?..

What was the UK’s favourite car colour for 2017? © Copyright Roger Templeman and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

 

Here’s a rundown in ascending order of the UK’s top 10 favourite car colours for 2017:

10. Yellow (10,301 cars) – what a disappointment to find the demand for yellow on a downward spiral in 2017, falling by 17.1% compared to 2016. What’s going on with us Brits, we all need colour in our lives to brighten up the days!

9. Bronze (12,421 cars) – now that’s a surprise, yellow just makes it into tenth spot yet bronze picks up ninth place – 0.5% of all new cars in 2017 were bronze!

8. Orange (19,054 cars) – that’s more like it, a bit of juicy orange to brighten up our roads! It seems the colour orange was more in favour last year than the previous one – fantastic!

7. Green (26,834 cars) – year on year the colour green takes around a 1% market share and the same can be said for 2017.

6. Red (251,104 cars) – as you can see, the jump from green to red is massive. Red always appears in the top 10 but in 2017, popularity fell by 1.4% – seems as though the once most popular colour in the UK has fallen out of favour.

5. Silver (254,192 cars) – a popular choice as always yet down 0.1% in 2017.

4. Blue (405,758 cars) – a huge 16% market share for blue in the UK for 2017. You simply can’t go wrong with a shade of blue.

3. White (482,099 cars) – the nations favourite colour for the past four years but in 2017, registrations dropped by 1.5 per cent.

2. Grey (500,714 cars) – we Brits seem to love this colour for our motor and in 2017, the demand for grey rose by 2.4%, taking an overall 19.7% market share.

So what was the UK’s favourite car colour for 2017? Well, it looks as though black is back!

1. Black (515,970 cars) – Black is most certainly back after being away for five years and has knocked white off the top spot to take the crown for 2017 as the UK’s favourite car colour.

According to the SMMT, the fastest-growing car colour last year was, wait for it.. gold! Demand for the colour gold shot up by 19% in 2017 – slightly surprising but true even though the colour did only make up a small 0.2% share of the market.

 

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